Japanese Folklore The Story of Love Reincarnation

Author: Xenohikawa Sabrina
Publisher:
ISBN: 1370115490
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Many years ago in Yedo, in the district of Fukagawa, there lived a rich timber merchant. He and his wife dwelt together in perfect accord, but though their business prospered and their wealth increased as the years went by, they were a disappointed couple, for by the time they had reached middle age they were still unblessed with children. This was a great grief to them, for the one desire of their lives was to have a child. The merchant at last determined to make a pilgrimage to several temples in company with his wife, and to supplicate the gods for the long yearned-for joy of offspring. When the arduous tour was over they both went to a resort in the hills noted for its mineral springs, the woman hoping earnestly that the medicinal waters would improve her health and bring about the desired result. A year passed and the merchant's wife at last gave birth to a daughter. Both parents rejoiced that the Gods had answered their prayers. They reared the child with great care, likening her to a precious gem held tenderly in both hands, and they named her Tama, the Jewel. As an infant Tama gave promise of great beauty, and when she grew into girlhood she more than fulfilled that promise. Their friends all declared that they had never seen such loveliness, and people compared her to a morning-glory, besprinkled with dew and glowing with the freshness of a summer dawn. She had a tiny mole on the side of her snowy neck. This was her sole and distinguishing blemish. Tama, the Jewel, proved a gifted child. She acquired reading and the writing of hieroglyphics with remarkable facility, and in all her studies was in advance of girls of her own age. She danced with grace, and sang and played the koto enchantingly, and she was also accomplished in the arts of flower-arrangement and the tea-ceremony.

Asia Folklore The Tale of Love Reincarnation Bilingual Edition English Spanish

Author: Xenoharunai Sakura
Publisher: Xenoharunai Sakura Studio
ISBN: 0464840503
Format: PDF, Docs
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Many years ago in Yedo, in the district of Fukagawa, there lived a rich timber merchant. He and his wife dwelt together in perfect accord, but though their business prospered and their wealth increased as the years went by, they were a disappointed couple, for by the time they had reached middle age they were still unblessed with children. This was a great grief to them, for the one desire of their lives was to have a child. The merchant at last determined to make a pilgrimage to several temples in company with his wife, and to supplicate the gods for the long yearned-for joy of offspring. When the arduous tour was over they both went to a resort in the hills noted for its mineral springs, the woman hoping earnestly that the medicinal waters would improve her health and bring about the desired result. A year passed and the merchant's wife at last gave birth to a daughter. Both parents rejoiced that the Gods had answered their prayers. They reared the child with great care, likening her to a precious gem held tenderly in both hands, and they named her Tama, the Jewel. As an infant Tama gave promise of great beauty, and when she grew into girlhood she more than fulfilled that promise. Their friends all declared that they had never seen such loveliness, and people compared her to a morning-glory, besprinkled with dew and glowing with the freshness of a summer dawn. She had a tiny mole on the side of her snowy neck. This was her sole and distinguishing blemish. Tama, the Jewel, proved a gifted child. She acquired reading and the writing of hieroglyphics with remarkable facility, and in all her studies was in advance of girls of her own age. She danced with grace, and sang and played the koto enchantingly, and she was also accomplished in the arts of flower-arrangement and the tea-ceremony. When she reached the age of sixteen her parents thought it was time to seek a suitable bridegroom for her. Very early marriages were the custom of the day, and besides that her parents wished to see her happily established in life before they grew older. As she was the only child, her husband would become the adopted son, and thus the succession to the family would be secured. However, it proved exceedingly difficult to find anyone who would meet all their requirements. Now it happened that near-by in a small house there lived a man by the name of Hayashi. He was a provincial samurai, but for some reason or other had left his Daimio's domain and settled in Yedo. His wife was long since dead, but he had an only son whom he educated in the refinements of the military class. The family was a poor one, for all samurai were trained to hold poverty in high esteem; and to despise trade and money-making. Both father and son led simple lives and eked out their small patrimony by giving lessons in the reading of the classics and in calligraphy, and by telling fortunes according to the Confucian system of divination. Both were respected by all who knew them for their learning and upright lives. Hace muchos años en Yedo, en el distrito de Fukagawa, vivía un rico comerciante de madera. Él y su esposa vivían juntos en perfecto acuerdo, pero aunque su negocio prosperó y su riqueza aumentó con el paso de los años, fueron una pareja desilusionada, ya que cuando alcanzaron la madurez todavía no tenían hijos. Esto fue un gran dolor para ellos, ya que el único deseo de sus vidas era tener un hijo. El mercader finalmente decidió hacer una peregrinación a varios templos en compañía de su esposa, y suplicar a los dioses por la largamente anhelada alegría de descendencia. Cuando terminó la ardua visita, ambos fueron a un centro turístico en las colinas, famoso por sus manantiales de aguas minerales, y la mujer esperaba fervientemente que las aguas medicinales mejoraran su salud y dieran el resultado deseado. Pasó un año y la esposa del comerciante dio a luz a una hija. Ambos padres se regocijaron de que los dioses habían respondido sus oraciones. Criaron al niño con gran cuidado, comparándola con una gema preciosa sostenida tiernamente con ambas manos, y la llamaron Tama, la Joya. Cuando era niña, Tama le prometió una gran belleza, y cuando creció hasta la adolescencia, ella cumplió esa promesa con creces. Todos sus amigos declararon que nunca habían visto tal belleza, y la gente la comparó con una gloria de la mañana, salpicada de rocío y brillando con la frescura de un amanecer de verano. Ella tenía un pequeño lunar en el lado de su cuello cubierto de nieve. Esta era su única y distintiva imperfección. Tama, la Joya, demostró ser una niña dotada. Ella adquirió la lectura y la escritura de jeroglíficos con notable facilidad, y en todos sus estudios fue por delante de las niñas de su edad. Ella bailó con gracia, y cantó y tocó el koto con encanto, y también se llevó a cabo en las artes del arreglo floral y la ceremonia del té.

Twenty Cases Suggestive of Reincarnation

Author: Ian Stevenson
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813908724
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Can anyone speak a language he or she has not learned normally, in childhood or later? Claims to have accomplished this are made from time to time, but only rarely do they receive support when carefully examines. In this volume Dr. Stevenson presents detailed reports of two cases taht seem authentic. Authentic instances of speaking a language that has not been learned normally (responsive xenoglossy) suggest that another personality (perhaps one of a previous life) had learned the langauge. Cases of responsive xenoglossy thus add to the evidence concerning the survival of human personality after death.

Japanese Folklore The Tale of Young Samurai Beautiful Ghost

Author: Xenohikawa Sabrina
Publisher:
ISBN: 1370704062
Format: PDF, Docs
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Many years ago, long before the present prosaic era, there lived in Yedo a young man named Toshika. His family belonged to the aristocratic rank of the hatamoto samurai, those knights who possessed the right to march to battle directly under the Shogun's flag (hata), and his father was a high official in the Tokugawa Shogunate. Toshika, whose disposition was of a dreamy and indolent nature with scholarly tastes, had no occupation. He took life easily, and when his studies were finished, he went to live at the family villa situated in the suburb of Aoyama. Toshika was not interested in society, and except for an occasional visit to his home or to his favourite friend, he never went anywhere. Far from the world he spent his days quietly and pleasantly, reading books, tending and watering his flowers, practising the tea-ceremony, and composing poetry and playing on the flute. He was a young man of many accomplishments and studied art. He collected curios and specimens of well-known calligraphy, which all Japanese prize greatly, and he particularly delighted in pictures. One day a certain friend whom Toshika had not seen for several months, came to call upon him. He had just returned from a visit to the seaport of Nagasaki and knowing the young man's tastes had brought with him, as a present, a Chinese drawing of a beautiful woman, which he begged Toshika to accept. Toshika was very pleased with this acquisition to his treasures. He examined the painting carefully, and though he could find no signature of the artist, his knowledge of the subject told him that it was probably drawn by the well-known Chinese painter of the Shin era. It was the portrait of a young woman in the prime of youth, and Toshika felt intuitively that it was a real likeness. The face was one of radiant loveliness, and the longer he gazed at it, the more the charm and fascination of it grew upon him. He carried it to his own room and hung it up in the alcove. Whenever he felt lonely he retired to the solitude of his chamber, and sat for hours before the drawing, looking at it and even addressing it. As the days went by, gradually the picture seemed to glow with life and Toshika began to think of it as a person. He wondered who the original of the portrait could have been, and said that he envied the artist who had been granted the happiness of looking upon her beauty. Daily the figure seemed more alive and the face more exquisite, and Toshika, as he gazed in rapture upon it, longed to know its history. The haunting pathos of the expression and the speaking wistfulness of the dark soft eyes called to his heart like music and gave him no peace. Toshika, in fact, became enamoured of the lovely image suspended in the alcove, and as the infatuation grew upon him he placed fresh flowers before it, changing them daily. At night he had his quilts so arranged that the last thing he looked upon before closing his eyes in sleep was the lady of the picture.

Receptions of Greek and Roman Antiquity in East Asia

Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004370714
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Receptions of Greek and Roman Antiquity in East Asia broadens the scope of the Western Classical tradition by offering pioneering insights (of leading scholars from Europe, East Asia, and North America) into East Asian receptions of Greco-Roman Antiquity.

Storytelling

Author: Josepha Sherman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317459385
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Storytelling is an ancient practice known in all civilizations throughout history. Characters, tales, techniques, oral traditions, motifs, and tale types transcend individual cultures - elements and names change, but the stories are remarkably similar with each rendition, highlighting the values and concerns of the host culture. Examining the stories and the oral traditions associated with different cultures offers a unique view of practices and traditions."Storytelling: An Encyclopedia of Mythology and Folklore" brings past and present cultures of the world to life through their stories, oral traditions, and performance styles. It combines folklore and mythology, traditional arts, history, literature, and festivals to present an overview of world cultures through their liveliest and most fascinating mode of expression. This appealing resource includes specific storytelling techniques as well as retellings of stories from various cultures and traditions.

Plum and Bamboo

Author: Mark Bender
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252028212
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In the cities of the Yangzi River delta region of China, audiences sip tea in story houses while storytellers speak and sing stories accompanied by stringed instruments. The stories unfold week after week, usually revolving around a love intrigue. Plum and Bamboo is a thorough introduction to this enchanting oral narrative tradition that still flourishes in Shanghai and in Suzhou, an ancient city known as the city of gardens. Storytelling in China was once a major art form that rivaled opera and other performance genres. The Suzhou chantefable of today is a rich, local tradition and one of the most viable storytelling traditions in the world, with hundreds of active storytellers in the Yangzi delta region. Drawing on extensive fieldwork and an appreciation of the Chinese art, Mark Bender utilizes a folkloristic approach to provide an overview of the tradition, focusing on the contextualized performance of narrative. In addition to supplying historical and contextual background, the book examines how oral territory is opened and explored in performance. transcript of the Meng Lijun story and interlinear commentary by the storytellers; four appendixes including outlines of traditional stories, some of which are synopsized here for the first time in English; and a romanized transcript of a portion of a performance in Suzhou dialect. A truly important work, a major contribution to a field virtually unstudied in the West and poorly studied in China until very recently. - Susan Blader, associate professor of Chinese at Dartmouth College.

Japanese Folklore The Legend of Eternal Life

Author: Xenohikawa Sabrina
Publisher:
ISBN: 1370052308
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Long, long ago there lived a man called Sentaro. His surname meant "Millionaire," but although he was not so rich as all that, he was still very far removed from being poor. He had inherited a small fortune from his father and lived on this, spending his time carelessly, without any serious thoughts of work, till he was about thirty-two years of age. One day, without any reason whatsoever, the thought of death and sickness came to him. The idea of falling ill or dying made him very wretched. "I should like to live," he said to himself, "till I am five or six hundred years old at least, free from all sickness. The ordinary span of a man's life is very short." He wondered whether it were possible, by living simply and frugally henceforth, to prolong his life as long as he wished. He knew there were many stories in ancient history of emperors who had lived a thousand years, and there was a Princess of Yamato, who, it was said, lived to the age of five hundred This was the latest story of a very long life record.

Children s Past Lives

Author: Carol Bowman
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 0307482782
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Has your child lived before? In this fascinating, controversial, and groundbreaking book, Carol Bowman reveals overwhelming evidence of past life memories in children. Not only are such experiences real, they are far more common than most people realize. Bowman's extraordinary investigation was sparked when her young son, Chase, described his own past-life death on a Civil War battlefield--an account so accurate it was authenticated by an expert historian. Even more astonishing, Chase's chronic eczema and phobia of loud noises completely disappeared after he had the memory. Inspired by Chase's dramatic healing, Bowman compiled dozens of cases and wrote this comprehensive study to explain how very young children remember their past lives, spontaneously and naturally. In Children's Past Lives, she tells how to distinguish between a true past life memory and a fantasy, offers practical advice to parents on how to respond to a past life memory, and shows how to foster the spiritual and healing benefits of these experiences. Perhaps the most moving, convincing, and best-documented evidence yet for life after death, Children's Past Lives will stand alongside the classics of Betty J. Eadie, Raymond Moody, and Brian Weiss in its power to comfort, uplift, and transform our thinking about life after death