South The Story Of Shackletons Last Expedition 1914 1917 Ernest Shackleton Classics Of World Literature Annotated English Edition Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Encyclopedia of the Antarctic
Author: Beau Riffenburgh
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0415970245
Pages: 1146
Year: 2007
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Antarctica is the only major part of the Earth's landmass not directly governed by one nation, but under the control of a treaty, with a multitude of acceding nations. This reference brings together large quantities of information on the wide variety of factors, issues, and individuals influencing and relating to the Antarctic.
Subject Guide to Books in Print
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Year: 2003
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Books in Print 2009-2010
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ISBN: 0835250210
Pages:
Year: 2009
View: 736
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Forthcoming Books
Author: Rose Arny
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1989-09
View: 1006
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Aurora Australis
Author: Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton
Publisher: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 1465597530
Pages:
Year: 2016-10-21
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If Ross Island be likened to a castle, flanking that wall the the world's end, The Great Ice Barrier, Erebus is the castle keep. Its flanks and foothills clothed with spotless now, patched with the pale blue of glacier ice, its active crater crowned with a spreading smoke cloud, and overlooking the vast white plain of the Barrier to the East and South, the dark waters of Ross Sea and McMurdo Sound to the North and West, and still further West, the snowy summits of the extinct volcanoes of Victoria Land, Erebus not only commands a view of incomparable grandeur and interest, but is in itself one of the fairest and most majestic sights that Earth can show. Erebus, as seen from our winter quarters, showed distinctly the traces of the three craters, observed from a distance by the British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901 - 04. From sea level up to about 5,500 feet, the lower slopes ascend in a gentle but gradually steepening curve to the base of the first crater. They are largely covered with snow and glacier ice down to the shore, where the ice either breaks off to form a cliff, or, as at Glacier Tongue, spreads out seawards in the form of a narrow blue pier five miles in length: near Cape Rows, however, there are three long smooth ridges of brown glacial gravels and moraines mostly bare of snow. Those are interspersed with masses of black volcanic rock, and extend to an altitude of about 1,000ft. Above this, and up to above 5,000 feet above the sea, all is snow and ice, except of an occasional outcrop of dark lava, or a black parasitic cone, sharply silhouetted agains the light background of snow or sky. At a level of about 6,000 feet, and just north of the second, or main crater, rises a huge black fang of rock, the relic of the oldest and lowest crater. Immediately south of this the principal cone sweeps upwards in that graceful double curve, concave below, convex above, so characteristic of volcanos. Rugged buttresses of dark volcanic rock, with steep snow slopes between, jut out at intervals, and support the rim of this second crater, which reaches an altitude of fully 11,400 feet. From the north edge of this crater the ground seemed to ascend, at first gradually, then somewhat abruptly to the third crater, now active, further south. It is above this last crater that there continually floats a huge steam cloud. At the time of Ross’ Expedition this cloud was reddened with the glow of molten lava, and some thought they saw lava streams descending from the crater. The National Antarctic Expedition had also once or twice witnessed a similar glow, and although, during the few weeks we had been at Cape Royds we had not observed a similar phenomenon, we had at times seen the great steam cloud shoot up suddenly, in the space of a minute or so, to a height of fully 2,000 feet above the mountain top. This sudden uprush was obviously the result of a vast steam explosion in the interior of the volcano, and proved that it still possessed considerable activity.
Escape from the Antarctic
Author: Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton
Publisher: Penguin Group USA
ISBN: 0141032111
Pages: 89
Year: 2007
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This beautifully packaged volume captures, in the words of veteran explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton, his excruciating and inspiring expedition to Antarctica aboard the "Endurance."
Shackleton, his Antarctic writings
Author: Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton
Publisher:
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Pages: 263
Year: 1983
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Standard Catalog for Public Libraries
Author: Minnie Earl Sears
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 285
Year: 1929
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The Worst Journey in the World: Antarctic 1910-1913
Author: Apsley Cherry-Garrard
Publisher: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 1613104367
Pages: 569
Year: 1937
View: 1269
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Woolf and the Art of Exploration
Author: Helen Southworth, Elisa Kay Sparks
Publisher: Clemson Univ Digital Press
ISBN: 0977126382
Pages: 253
Year: 2006
View: 574
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The South Polar Trail
Author: Ernest Edward Mills Joyce
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 220
Year: 1929
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A personal account of the experience of the Ross Sea party of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, based on a log kept by the author.
The Home of the Blizzard Being the Story of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911-1914
Author: Douglas Mawson
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 1409224643
Pages: 696
Year: 2010-01
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Mawson turned down an invitation to join Robert Falcon Scott's Terra Nova Expedition in 1910; Australian geologist Griffith Taylor went instead. Dawson chose to lead his own expedition, the Australian Antarctic Expedition, to King George V Land and Adelie Land, the sector of the Antarctic continent immediately south of Australia, which at the time was almost entirely unexplored. The objectives were to carry out geographical exploration and scientific studies, including visiting the South Magnetic Pole.
Shackleton's Boat Journey
Author: F. A. Worsley
Publisher: Wakefield Press
ISBN: 1862547750
Pages: 143
Year: 2007
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This is the classic account of Sir Ernest Shackleton's 1914-1916 Antarctic expedition. Written by the captain of the Endurance, the ship used by Shackleton on this ill-fated journey, it is a remarkable tale of courage and bravery in the face of extreme odds and a vivid portrait of one of the world's greatest explorers. "A breathtaking story of courage under the most appalling conditions." - Edmund Hillary
One man's initiation: 1917
Author: John Dos Passos
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 179
Year: 1969
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South with Endurance
Author: Frank Hurley
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 074322292X
Pages: 320
Year: 2001
View: 1312
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The definitive collection of photographs from the Shackleton expedition includes never-before-published images from the remarkable 1914 expedition to Antarctica.